PHL 4172 /PSY 4172 Philosophy of Psychiatry and Psychology

CRN    93476/ 93477

Room:  RC 324

MW      11:30am-12:51pm

Professor Christian Perring, Department of Philosophy.

 

E-mail: perringc at dowling.edu  [All email to me should have "4172" in the subject line]

Texting: message me at 631-256-7167, always starting your message with "4172" and your name.

Office Phone: 244-3349

Office: 330B RC (next to the computer lab)

Office Hours: MW 9AM-10AM, M230-500PM, T 11:30AM-1:00PM

 

The aim of this course is to cover central areas in the philosophy of psychiatry. 

We will discuss what counts as a mental illness, and the political and ethical issues around psychiatric classification.  We will also discuss ethical issues in treatment, including hospitalization, medication and psychotherapy.  We will also discuss the responsibility of mentally ill people for their actions, and the legal system and family and friends should respond when they cause harm or do not fulfil their responsibilities.

 

Email and Blackboard.  You should check your Dowling email at least twice a week.  You should check the Blackboard shell for this course at least once a week.

Plagiarism detection and prevention: All papers should be submitted via Turnitin.com in MS Word or RTF.  I will give you information about how to use Turnitin.com.  Note that I view any form of academic dishonesty very seriously, and if I find that you have engaged in any significant form of plagiarism or cheating I will fail you in this course and report my action to the Dean of Students.

Attendance:  Attendance is required. You need to be in the classroom by the start of the class period, when I will take attendance.  If you are late, you only get half-credit for attendance that day.  If you are late to class, you need to speak to me at the end of class to explain why you were late and ask me to record your presence on my roster.  If you need to miss a class, you should notify me by phone or email before the class.  If you are ill and see a medical professional, or you have an unavoidable legal obligation, you should show me some documentation as evidence.  Your attendance grade will suffer significantly if you miss classes without excuse.  If you miss a class, you should write a 600 word summary of a portion of the reading assigned for that class, or arrange some alternative make-up work.  If you miss more than 5 classes without excuse or make up, you can fail the course. 

 

Papers.  Your paper is a major part of your grade.  You need to be thinking about it from the start of the semester.  I will give you some possible paper topics.  You can only create your own paper topic if you get it approved by me first.  Your paper needs to be in APA format.  You need to use scholarly sources -- you can use the materials in the course syllabus.  You can and should use the materials we discuss in class. You can get a good grade (B) if you only those materials and you made a strong argument.  If you want to get an A, you have to find at least 2 scholarly sources that were not discussed in class, and you have to discuss them at length in your paper.  Your paper must be submitted via Turnitin.com.  It must use APA format.  The minimum acceptable length is 1800 words -- shorter papers will get a D or an F.  If you have never written a philosophy paper, I recommend you search the internet for guides to writing a philosophy paper and read them carefully.  I recommend Jim Pryor's guidelines.  I will give you comments on your draft, and you need to improve that draft into a better final paper.

Laptops and Texting: No laptops.  They are very distracting to me and other students.  You can use a tablet like an iPad if you want, for note taking.  Texting is distracting to me and other students, and it is especially rude during student presentations.  If you frequently check your text messages and text in class, then I will know you are not paying full attention and your effort grade will go down.  If I notice you texting in an especially distracting manner, I will ask you to leave the classroom. 

Classroom Etiquette.   All cell phones ringers should be turned off and you should never talk on your cell phone in class.  You should not eat any food in class, especially food that others will notice through sound or smell.  You should turn up on time to all classes.  You are free to express your views and question the views of others, including your professor, and you can be passionate about your opinions.  However, you must always treat others in the class with respect; you can criticize the views and arguments of others, but you cannot criticize them as persons.  You should also make sure you are not dominating classroom discussion to the exclusion of other class members. 

Sleeping.  If you can't stay awake in the class, then you have not come to class prepared to learn, and you need to leave.   It is annoying and distracting to others.

Emotional concerns.  Discussing controversial issues connected with personal experiences of mental illness and family dynamics can bring up powerful emotions, especially for people with difficult or abusive experiences in their past.  So it is important that the classroom be a safe and supportive space for everyone in it.  If at any point during class you do experience overwhelming emotions, then you are quite free to leave and take some time for yourself.  Please let me know either when you leave the classroom or afterwards.

Academic and Personal Problems.  If you have problems that cause you to be late with work or to miss a number of classes, please stay in communication by phone, email, or by meeting with me in person.  I will be willing to work with you and sort out a way for you to still stay in the class and get a fair grade.  If you miss a number of classes or fail to hand in work on time but don't give me any explanation then you risk failing the class.  Most people experience some sort of crisis during their college career, and you need to find ways to make sure that such problems don't ruin your college career.

 

Requirements:

Class participation (in class and/or online) (10%)

Presentation (15%)

Paper (35%)

Midterm test (15%)

Reaction pieces on the readings.  (10%)

Final test (15%)

 

Expectations. 

General comment.  This is an undergraduate senior-level course, and so I expect students to show considerable sophistication in their understanding and thought about the issues.  It will not be enough just to memorize facts and repeat them back.  Students should be able to think for themselves and show an ability to examine topics carefully. 

Meeting with me.  I want all students to meet with me in my office hours at least once in the semester, to discuss their work.  The prime purpose of the meeting will be to discuss their focus for their paper and presentation, but this course may also bring up some personal issues and this would be an occasion to work out how to either use them or keep them under control for the course. 

Reading:  There will be no textbook assigned for this course.  Instead, I will assign scholarly work which I will make available to students.  Each week I will specify one or two articles or book chapters that I expect students to read and I will lecture on those articles, explaining them carefully.  The tests will be on those texts.  I will expect students to know what those texts say: both the view advocated and the argument for the conclusion.  You will need to be able to explain it in your writing.

There will also be optional reading.  This will include other scholarly work, newspaper and magazine articles, blogs, memoirs, and novels.  I will also include some discussion of TV shows and movies.  I don't expect students to read and view everything on the syllabus, but I will expect students to do some reading beyond the required material.  It would make sense for students to focus on material that will help their paper. 

Lectures.  Each week I will devote time to lecturing, normally one lecture per class.  The aim of the lectures will be to explain central ideas and discussing their relevance.  I plan for lectures to be about 20-30 minutes long.  I will signal the start and the end of the lecture.  Students should take notes and I will expect them to master the material in the lecture.  There will be test questions on the lectures.

Presentations.  Your presentation will be about 15 minutes long.  It can be on any topic relevant to the course, but I want to talk with you about it as you prepare.  An obvious way to do it is to describe the case of a particular person, how that person made life harder for those around them, and to what extent their psychological problems meant that they were not responsible or could seek forgiveness.  The presentation could discuss how the person's problems affected their relationship with family members and those close to them, and how those people reacted to the person's problematic behavior.  The cases you choose can be from memoirs, magazine articles, novels, movies, documentaries, or people you know in your own life.

Scheduling Your Presentation.  You should try to schedule your presentation at a time that fits well with the topic of the class.  (See the Semester Schedule)  I will try to accommodate your requests as much as possible.

 

 

Final Deadline. December 16, 2014.  No work will be accepted after this day.

 

 

Date

Topic

Readings

Work Due

 

Sept W 3

 

 

 

 

M 8

 

Derek Bolton: What is Mental Illness?

John Z. Sadler: Vice and Mental Disorders

 

 

W 10

 

George Graham: Ordering Disorder: Mental disorder, brain disorder, and therapeutic Intervention

Matthew Ratcliffe: Depression and the phenomenology of free will

 

 

M 15

 

Louis Sass and Elizabeth Pienkos: Delusion: The phenomenological approach

S. Nassir Ghaemi: Understanding Mania and Depression

 

 

W 17

 

Walter Sinnott-Armstrong and Hanna Pickard: What is Addiction?

Owen Flanagan: Identity and Addiction: What alcoholic memoirs teach

 

 

M 22

 

Peter Zachar and Robert F. Krueger: Personality Disorder and Validity: A History of Controversy

 

 

M 29

 

Rachel Cooper: Natural Kinds

 

 

Oct W 1

 

Hanna Pickard: Responsibility without Blame: Philosophical Reflections on Clinical Practice

Lubomira Radoilska: Depression, Decisional Capacity, and Personal Autonomy

 

 

M 6

 

Genetic Determinism, Neuronal Determinism, and Determinism Tout Court, Bernard Baertschi and Alexandre Mauron

 

 

W 8

 

The Rise of Neuroessentialism, Peter B. Reiner

 

 

M 13 (Columbus Day)

No class

 

 

 

W 15

 

Midterm exam

 

 

M 20

 

A Neuroscientific Approach to Addiction: Ethical Concerns, Martina Reske and Martin P. Paulus

The Neurobiology of Addiction: Implications for Voluntary Control of Behaviour, Steven E. Hyman

Neuroethics of Free Will, Patrick Haggard

 

 

W 22

 

Sissela Bok: The Limits of Confidentiality

Sir Douglas Black: Absolute Confidentiality

 

 

M 27

 

Tarasoff, Donaldson v O'Connor

 

 

W 29

 

John Pearce Consent to Treatment during childhood

 

 

Nov 3

 

Rhoda Fisher Seymour Fisher Antidepressants for Children

 

 

W 5

 

Ronald Dworkin Autonomy and the Demented Self

Rebecca Dresser Dworkin on Dementia

 

 

M 10

 

Jeremy Holmes Values in Psychotherapy

 

 

W 12

 

Mark Munetz et al The Ethics of Mandatory Community Treatment

 

 

M 17

 

C.W. Van Staden, C Kruger: Incapacity to give informed consent owing to mental disorder

 

 

W 19

 

Paul Chodoff Involuntary Hospitalization of the Mentally Ill as a Moral Issue

 

 

M 24

 

Geoge I Szmukler and Sidney Bloch: Family Involvement in the Care of People with Psychoses

 

 

Dec M 1

 

Fredrik Svenaeus: Psychopharmacology and the Self

 

 

W 3

 

Bennett Foddy, Guy Kahane, and Julian Savulescu: Practical neuropsychiatric Ethics

 

 

M 8

 

David A. Jopling: Placebo Effects in Psychiatry and Psychotherapy

 

 

W 10

 

Richard Gipps: Assumptions behind CBT: a philosophical appraisal

Paper due

 

M 15

 

Final exam

 

 

 

Readings

 

Oxford Handbook of Neuroethics\

Genetic Determinism, Neuronal Determinism, and Determinism Tout Court, Bernard Baertschi and Alexandre Mauron

The Rise of Neuroessentialism, Peter B. Reiner

A Neuroscientific Approach to Addiction: Ethical Concerns, Martina Reske and Martin P. Paulus

The Neurobiology of Addiction: Implications for Voluntary Control of Behaviour, Steven E. Hyman

Neuroethics of Free Will, Patrick Haggard

 

Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Psychiatry

Daniel Robinson: The insanity defense as a history of mental disorder

Louis C. Charland: Why Psychiatry Should Fear Medicalization

Larry Davidson: Cure and Recovery

28: Derek Bolton: What is Mental Illness?

29: John Z. Sadler: Vice and Mental Disorders

30: Lisa Bortolotti: Rationality and Sanity: The role of rationality judgements in understanding psychiatric disorders

31: Jennifer Church: Boundary Problems: Negotiating the Challenges of Responsibility and Loss

32: George Graham: Ordering Disorder: Mental disorder, brain disorder, and therapeutic Intervention

Matthew Ratcliffe: Depression and the phenomenology of free will

Louis Sass and Elizabeth Pienkos: Delusion: The phenomenological approach

: S. Nassir Ghaemi: Understanding Mania and Depression

50: Walter Sinnott-Armstrong and Hanna Pickard: What is Addiction?

51: Owen Flanagan: Identity and Addiction: What alcoholic memoirs teach

52: Peter Zachar and Robert F. Krueger: Personality Disorder and Validity: A History of Controversy

56: Rachel Cooper: Natural Kinds

66: Hanna Pickard: Responsibility without Blame: Philosophical Reflections on Clinical Practice

67: Lubomira Radoilska: Depression, Decisional Capacity, and Personal Autonomy

68: Fredrik Svenaeus: Psychopharmacology and the Self

69: Bennett Foddy, Guy Kahane, and Julian Savulescu: Practical neuropsychiatric Ethics

70: David A. Jopling: Placebo Effects in Psychiatry and Psychotherapy

72: Richard Gipps: Assumptions behind CBT: a philosophical appraisal

 

Anthology of Psychiatric Ethics

Sissela Bok: The Limits of Confidentiality

Sir Douglas Black: Absolute Confidentiality

Tarasoff

Geoge I Szmukler and Sidney Bloch: Family Involvement in the Care of People with Psychoses

Paul Chodoff Involuntary Hospitalization of the Mentally Ill as a Moral Issue

C.W. Van Staden, C Kruger: Incapacity to give informed consent owing to mental disorder

Mark Munetz et al The Ethics of Mandatory Community Treatment

Donaldson v O'Connor

Rhoda Fisher Seymour Fisher Antidepressants for Children

Jeremy Holmes Values in Psychotherapy

John Pearce Consent to Treatment during childhood

Ronald Dworkin Autonomy and the Demented Self

Rebecca Dresser Dworkin on Dementia